QUEEN ELIZABETH'S 1961 VISIT TO GHANA AND THE GIFT OF GOLD PALANQUIN FROM GHANAIAN CHIEFS!



QUEEN ELIZABETH'S 1961 VISIT TO GHANA AND THE GIFT OF GOLD PALANQUIN FROM GHANAIAN CHIEFS! 

Queen Elizabeth II came to Ghana for the first time in 1961, after the country had successfully become independent from British rule. She went to Cape Coast, Kumasi, and Tamale during her trip. 

The whole Western Province met at Victoria Park in Cape Coast for a durbar of chiefs (Western and Central Region were one region until 1970). Gold arts and decorations were given to her as gifts. Nana Akyin, who was President of the House of Chiefs and Omanhen of Ekumfi at the time, gave the "gift" of gold. 

The Queen also went to Kumasi for a Chiefs' Durbar in the Ashante Region. About 35,000 people, including about 150 major and minor chiefs, were there to see her. The Asantehene, Otumfuo Sir Osei Agyeman Prempeh II, was in charge of the ceremony. There, the Queen also got many presents. "As his entourage fanned him with palm fronds, the Asantehene gave the Queen a set of talking drums made of carved ivory and gave Philip 40 pieces of Ashanti gold." 

She also went to a meeting of chiefs, called a durbar, in Tamale. There, she was given traditional northern materials and other gifts. Tribal chiefs in the northern territories put on dazzling ceremonies called durbars for royal guests. At Tamale, the End of the Harvest dance was done by strong warriors who wore grass skirts that were as short as bikinis. 

Queen Elizabeth didn't just go to Durbars. She also went to local markets and schools, and wherever she went in Ghana, she was paraded through the streets (Accra, Kumasi, Cape Coast and Tamale) 

This gift from the Central Region House of Chiefs is considered a "work of art," which is why it's kept at the Buckingham Palace museum.


Source: content.time.com

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